Technology
Guides by Lonely Planet: Go Places with This One
Get to the heart of a destination with Guides by Lonely Planet. Packed with offline maps, audio phrasebooks, a currency converter and advice from on-the-ground experts, the city guides are the ultimate resource for travellers before and during a trip.
 
Lonely Planet is famous for its travel guides—each of them curated by travel writers who have visited each city and they presented each it in its true flavour. The guides are bulky and costly too.
 
Now, with this new app—Guides by Lonely Planet—you get the city guides for free—yes, free. Each city guide gives you details of what you can see, with friendly maps and directions and wonderful pics, where and what you can eat, where you can stay, shop, drink—whatever. You can save each city for offline use and pull it out when you are there, saving costly data charges while roaming. Currently, they have about 100+ cities listed and more are being added.
 
Simple bookmarking helps you to save and organise your favourite hotels, restaurants and things to do; so you can visit (or revisit) your personal must-see spots while on the road. With real-life experiences and essential tips, Guides by Lonely Planet are a boon to first-time travellers to any city. 
 
 

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Worried about mobile tower emission? Now, ask for an official test
New Delhi, Worried about mobile tower emission impacting your health? You can now ask the government to come and check the radiation level in your house.
 
The Department of Telecom (DoT) on Tuesday launched Tarang Sanchar, a web portal for information sharing on mobile towers and electro-magnetic field (EMF) emission compliance.
 
An official statement said the EMF portal is designed to provide a public interface where an easy map-based search feature has been provided for viewing the mobile towers in vicinity of any locality.
 
"By click of a button, information on EMF compliance status of mobile towers can be accessed. Detailed information about any tower site, if requested, will be sent on email to the users. Additionally, any person can request for EMF emission measurement at a location by paying a nominal fee of Rs 4,000 online," it says. 
 
The tests will be conducted by the local Telecom Enforcement Resource and Monitoring (TERM) field unit of the DoT and the test report would be provided to the requestor, the statement added.
 
Allaying fears about mobile tower radiation, Communications Minister Manoj Sinha, who inaugurated the portal, said India had 10 times stricter norms than global standards prescribed by International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and recommended by World Health Organization (WHO). 
 
He also said more towers were needed to have better connectivity. "We always talk about no call drops, but we do not want towers near our house," the minister said.
 
The minister said when people are ignorant about things, they tend to spread rumours. To have better connectivity, more infrastructure would be required, he pointed out.
 
"(Such) radiation has no adverse impact on human health. During the last 30 years, the WHO has conducted some 25,000 campaigns on this subject and never stated that mobile tower radiation has adverse impact on human health," he said.
 
Sinha said the launch of Tarang Sanchar portal will definitely help in clearing myths and misconceptions in public minds on mobile towers and EMF emissions from them.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

pradip

7 months ago

Very useful step by DoT which is at times laughed as idiotic. Allaying false great of public on radiation hazard from communication applications is dire need of the day. Ignorant and arrogant rumour mongers stoke finish in common folk which is hard to mitigate. Tarang sanchar is good step.

‘Internet of Things’: A Frankenstein?
Internet of Things (IoT), the all-embracing heterogeneous network of smart devices connected with each other via the Internet, is expanding at an exponential pace, and so are the risks associated with it. While IoT ensures that we are connected all the time, the developments in IoT, which do not take into consideration adequate security measures, continue to expose users to increased risks. 
 
The world is racing towards networking everything, from wearable gadgets to computers used in automobiles. The technical mavens are pushing us in that direction; but they have no really good supporting arguments for this, except to boost profits. This is especially so for a country like India which is a late entrant in this ‘connect everything’ disruption. The government and private enterprises are gung-ho about getting hold of our data, including financial data and biometrics. The drive to connect everything may have its roots in a desire for more power and increased market share. 
 
What exactly is the IoT and how does it work? IoT is the inter-networking of physical (smart) devices, vehicles, buildings, and other items, embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and network connectivity, that enable these objects to collect and exchange data. The ‘things’, in the IoT sense, refer to a wide variety of devices, such as heart monitoring implants, biochip transponders, electric clams,  automobiles with built-in sensors, DNA analysis devices and field operation devices that assist fire-fighters in search & rescue operations, to name a few.
 
Roughly speaking, there are three inter-connected aspects that define the IoT. First are sensors, which collect data, followed by ‘smart’ (processors) that analyse, or figure out, what the data collected means and decide on what to do with it. Last are the actuators that affect our environment. In other words, sensors are the eyes and ears, smart processors are the brain and actuators are hands and feet of the IoT. This, however, is a classic definition of a robot. With ever-increasing IoT, we are turning ourselves into miniscule parts of the gigantic robot that is getting smarter, more powerful and gaining capabilities, through the inter-connections we are building, without any real control or regulation. And this is the dangerous part.  
 
While for common people, IoT is a thing of convenience, for service- and device-providers, this creates an opportunity to measure, collect and analyse an ever-increasing variety of behavioural statistics. This cross-correlation of data could be very helpful for targeted marketing of products and services. 
 
Another reason why IoT could be dangerous is that the devices, such as cheap webcams, mobile phones, medical devices, smart-watches, anti-theft devices, drones and routers, are not designed with security in mind. As per reports, earlier this year, Spiral Toys, which sells CloudPets, the Internet-connected teddy bears that allow parents and kids to exchange messages, was found exposing the credentials of over 800,000 of its customers and two million messages. 
 
Add to this, the bots that have capabilities to disrupt almost everything on the IoT. In October 2016, a botnet, made up of about 100,000 compromised gadgets partially knocked off Dyn, an Internet infrastructure-provider. Taking down Dyn resulted in a cascade of effects that, ultimately, caused a long list of high-profile websites, including Twitter and Netflix, to temporarily disappear from the Internet. The botnet, in this case, was created with an easily available malware called Mirai.  
 
“On the Internet, attack is easier than defence because most software is poorly written and insecure,” says Bruce Schneier, security expert and chief technology officer of IBM Resilient, adding, “Connecting everything to each other via the Internet will expose new vulnerabilities.”
 
“If we cannot secure complex systems to the level required by their real-world capabilities, then we must not build a world where everything is computerised and interconnected,” Mr Schneier says, in his blogpost. 

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COMMENTS

Balaji Kasal

7 months ago

IoT or any other technology come with its own pros and cons. What matters is how policies are formed and citizens use it to leverage their lifestyle and experience matters. In same breath, knowing where we are driving through and exposing... Thanks.

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