Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Vaccination against the Vaccination Evangelists
News reports say that the Centre has shut the gate on the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation on a critical national health mission. A possible conflict of interest, arising from the Foundation’s ‘ties’ with pharmaceutical companies, is one of the reasons. “All financial ties of the country’s apex immunisation advisory body, the National Technical Advisory Group on Immunization (NTAGI), with the Gates Foundation have been cut off,” says a news report.
 
Nothing could have been better news for India’s future generations. Years ago, The Lancet, the leading medical journal of 185 years’ standing, made a detailed study of Bill Gates’ efforts in the health area and reported the results under the heading “Bill Gates—A Philanthropist or a Commercial Opportunist?” The conclusion was that he was the latter! 
 
“Gavi (the global vaccine alliance), which pushes the vaccine agenda in India, had to face the Indian press in 2012 which reported that some 47,500 children had been paralysed as a direct result of the polio vaccination campaign that had swept through their populous country. India’s National Polio Surveillance Project found that a sharp rise in the cases of non-polio paralysis correlated with areas where doses of oral polio vaccine were also increased. Worse, children afflicted with polio vaccine-derived non-polio paralysis were at more than twice the risk of dying than with wild polio infection,” wrote Aaron Dykes, Truthstream  Media, in 2013. 
 
In this connection, a recent issue of Time magazine caught my attention. The lengthy article was all about how President Trump’s policies on the ‘science’ of global warming and the ‘science’ of vaccination could kill this world and so on. Ever since Trump got elected, in fact, even long before that, the US media wanted him to be defeated; now to be defamed. Why do people spend so much effort and money to spread falsehoods and mystery in the name of science, to denigrate any effort to question the Western scientific establishment’s beliefs? 
 
Al Gore’s agenda of global warming, abetted and aided by some of our scientists, is another area that needs further scrutiny. What is wrong if President Trump does not believe in the establishment science? A humble and honest scientist should be happy that there is a healthy debate in the world. Debate is good for science.
 
Oral polio vaccine should not be given to malnourished children, as the vaccine virus will mutate in that child’s gut and become the deadly P2-P3 variant, to produce polio in other children, spreading from the vaccinated child’s excreta! This is now reported in medical textbooks, but that is what was done in our polio campaign, some years ago. When I expressed this view at that time, I was pressurised to change my opinion by the then government—which I did not do.
 
Western science is only an enterprise, illogical to the core. Science is change, with every new discovery. Any humble scientist not connected with the trillion-dollar business of science should welcome any war on science, as it gives him an opportunity to convince the world that his theory is either right or needs further refining. 
 
Science tells us that any germ infection provokes either permanent or short-lived full immunity against that particular germ infection. But there is no sound science which says that we could mimic that situation artificially by vaccination, however sophisticated that method. The establishment that has vested interest in the business of vaccination has produced enough ‘scientific’ studies, mostly epidemiological, to say that vaccinations work. To understand the dubiousness of those studies, one has only to see the wonderful work of John Ioannidis of Stanford University where he has shown that more than 95% of the establishment-funded medical science research cannot be trusted, vaccination studies included!
 
One very interesting feature in the US is that drugs and vaccines are directly advertised through the electronic media; the consumer can sue the drug company for any side-effect, but cannot sue the vaccine company for any vaccine damage! This is strange and smacks of vaccine companies’ pressure on the government.
 

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COMMENTS

Pradeep Kumar M Sreedharan

4 months ago

Till 1950s, all drugs were mandated to be Pregnancy safe.
Then all companies paid Babus of the world and removed that clause
Hence all drugs that came out post 1950 is suspect.

Pradip Shah

7 months ago

I do believe in vaccination but only to a very limited extent. It should be limited to virus infections like small pox or others which have no cures. I was immunised at birth against small pox and have had a few booster shots in past 70 years. Did get infected by hepatitis, chickenpox, measles, typhoid, mumps, flu and what have you. Just a little care and own immune system took care of it each time. Haven't had the need to go to a doctor in may be past 25 years. Haven't suffered any kind of stomach ailment either. BTW I eat and drink every where. Haven't had any antibiotics either !

REPLY

Pradeep Kumar M Sreedharan

In Reply to Pradip Shah 4 months ago

Secondary Immunity

Ramesh Poapt

8 months ago

Great, Sirji!

Pradeep Kumar M Sreedharan

8 months ago

We the people don't follow the west, the decision makers are incentivised to follow the west.

Abhishek Kumar

8 months ago

This is not surprising , we follow west blindly , thinking they are right , but they all need to be questioned ?
Good article , hope to see more

Abhishek Kumar

8 months ago

This is not surprising , we follow west blindly , thinking they are right , but they all need to be questioned ?
Good article , hope to see more

You hurt my feelings, now make me a millionaire (The Funny Side)
Emotional distress is when you make a sarcastic comment on Facebook and every single friend thinks that's what you really think, and when you later point out that you don't actually advocate eating the unemployed or whatever, they think you are being sarcastic.
 
So then you're in a bad mood and switch to your email and find this: "Dear Mr Columnist, how much are my emotions worth in major currencies at today's rates in various countries around the world?"
 
The message from reader Agnes P.K. Ting baffled me -- until I clicked her link to a February news report: Police in the US just paid $885,000 to a pet-owner "for emotional distress" after they shot his pet dog. A second link led to a January report of a student who was asked to urinate in a bucket in a storeroom and received $1.25 million, also "for emotional distress".
 
"Why do we work to earn money instead of just waiting until someone hurts our feelings and then claim compensation for emotional distress," Agnes asked.
 
Good question. I thought the answer might be that these things only happen in the United States, a country which undoubtedly has a constitutional amendment saying something like: "The Right of The American People to File and Win Ridiculous Lawsuits Shall Never be Infringed."
 
But I checked with a lawyer who told me that people make emotional distress claims all over the world.
 
A teacher in the UK demanded compensation for being stressed out by kids and a court gave him 101,000 pounds ($125,000), before a higher court snatched it back arguing that "a person stressed out by kids" was pretty much the definition of teacher.
 
A guy in India watched a really bad Bollywood movie called "Rockstar" in 2014 and demanded Rs. 50,000, which is about $750, "on account of mental harassment and agony suffered". Given that Bollywood movies sometimes run three-and-a-half hours, he may have underpriced the damage.
 
In China, a man tried to sue actress Zhao Wei because her intense stare at the camera during a particular TV show caused him "spiritual damage". I can see how the attractive Ms Zhao could cause any male viewer to have significant non-spiritual thoughts. The courts eventually declined to hear the case, although if they had any brains they would have taken a week off to inspect Ms Zhao's videos as part of their "due diligence" process.
 
Still, I can see why courts in Asia refuse to pay compensation to viewers aggrieved by shockingly bad television. TV companies would basically be paying cash to every viewer every day for every show. And however much they paid, it wouldn't be enough.
 
Yet despite the rash of emotional distress lawsuits, let's remember that many claims fail. A colleague forwarded me a report about a woman who found her image was used without permission in a Chipotle restaurant promotion and asked for $2 billion. The courts recently ruled against her, but I think it was worth trying, just in case the judge had had a nice lunch and gave her a token $100 million to say sorry for the thumbs down.
 
Meanwhile, if any judges are reading this, how much can I get for the emotional distress of having a sarcastic comment misunderstood? Millions, right?
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Our lives are shaped by errors, some camel-sized (The Funny Side)
About two years ago, I tried to remove a bubble from my smartphone protective screen and accidentally bought a camel. Luckily, I managed to back out from the purchase by switching the phone off and turning around three times for luck, a useful trick I learned from my children.
 
For research reasons I had called up a screen which revealed that a 500-kilo live single-hump camel cost $1,540, which I considered intriguingly affordable. It was imagining my wife's reaction, which put me off. She: "You said you wouldn't buy any more ridiculous junk." Me (covering the camel's ears): "Dromo can hear you."
 
So I was sympathetic when reader Alice May Lo told me about a UK man who accidentally bought a bus. Dave Little, 27, woke up after partying in Ibiza, Spain, to see on his smartphone that he had the previous night purchased a full-sized tourist coach on ebay for $36,000, media reports said. "That beats the silliest thing I ever accidentally bought, which was a banana-only lunchbox that my daughter slipped into my shopping basket," Alice said.
 
It doesn't beat my record. In the 1990s, I accidentally bid at a Hong Kong land auction. For a tense half-minute I was a major property tycoon in the Trump bracket. Luckily, a passing billionaire outbid me, or I would have had something even harder to explain to my wife that evening. She: "How was your day, darling?" Me: "Nothing special, except that I bought Kowloon."
 
It's curious how our lives are shaped by accidents. This columnist has written about cases in the Philippines, the US and Vietnam where people dialed wrong numbers which escalated into arguments resolved with guns. People literally die of dialing wrong numbers.
 
To avoid this, respond to accidental calls good-naturedly. Reader Angela Sias told me she sang the whole of "Happy Birthday" to a stranger on the phone. After the listener pointed out her error, she said: "Oops, sorry." He continued: "No problem. You need all the practice you can get."
 
A techie colleague says that you no longer need complain about annoying accidental calls. You just record them and wreak revenge. Adobe Systems, maker of Photoshop, has a new programme which encodes voices from small samples. You can then type whatever words you like and hear them spoken in that voice. If like me you have a wonderfully creative ("desperately evil") streak, you can use the sound of a person's voice for literally thousands of illegal and immoral purposes, I mean harmless and amusing pranks.
 
But returning to accidental on-line purchases, a survey of friends and colleagues showed that they had bought items ranging from a sheep skull to pop star memorabilia. One person had bought huge amounts of spin-off merchandise (including "onesy" outfits) of licensed characters from children's television shows. "And I don't have children," she said. To get her money's worth, she dresses as Pikachu for her wine and chick-flick evenings.
 
That was when I started regretting my failure to complete my camel purchase. I saw myself swinging open the door to my spare room. "You think that's a story? Meet Dromo."
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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